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African history | Desmond Mpilo Tutu | south African history online


African Tutu during apartheid


African history , Desmond Mpilo Tutu , south African history online in 1976, the protests in Soweto, also known as the Soweto Riots, against the government's use of Afrikaans as the compulsory language of instruction in black schools became an uprising against apartheid.

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Archbishop Desmond Tutu on Forgiveness

Nobel Peace Prize Winner Desmond Tutu explains how love and forgiveness kept post-apartheid South Africa from tumbling into anarchy.

From then on Tutu supported an economic boycott of his country. He vigorously opposed the ;constructive engagement; policy of the Reagan administration in the United States, which advocated;friendly persuasion;.Tutu rather supported disinvestment, although it hit the poor hardest, for if disinvestment threw blacks out of work, Tutu argued, at least they would be suffering;with a purpose;. Tutu pressed the advantage and organised peaceful marches which brought 30,000 people onto the streets of Cape Town.

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Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu


The 14th Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Prize laureates. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 2004.After the fall of apartheid, Tutu headed the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. He retired as Archbishop of Cape Town in 1996 and was made emeritus Archbishop of Cape Town, an honorary title that is unusual in the Anglican church.

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the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu

This Seeds of Compassion event, which was held on the University of Washington campus April 15, features the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu leading an interspiritual panel to focus on the common theme of compassion that lies at the heart of the world's spiritual traditions.

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African history | Desmond Mpilo Tutu | south African history online He was succeeded by Njongonkulu Ndungane. At a thanksgiving for Tutu upon his retirement as Archbishop in 1996, Nelson Mandela said that Tutu made an;immeasurable contribution to our nation". Tutu is generally credited with coining the term Rainbow Nation as a metaphor for post-apartheid South Africa after 1994 under African National Congress rule. The expression has since entered mainstream consciousness to describe South Africa's ethnic diversity.

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Tutu headed the Truth and Reconciliation Commission


After the fall of apartheid, Tutu headed the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. He retired as Archbishop of Cape Town in 1996 and was made emeritus Archbishop of Cape Town, an honorary title that is unusual in the Anglican church. He was succeeded by Njongonkulu Ndungane. At a thanksgiving for Tutu upon his retirement as Archbishop in 1996, Nelson Mandela said that Tutu made an ;immeasurable contribution to our nation;.

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Tutu;South Africa's moral conscience;


Tutu is widely regarded as;South Africa's moral conscience; and has been described by former President of South Africa Nelson Mandela as;sometimes strident, often tender, never afraid and seldom without humour, Desmond Tutu's voice will always be the voice of the voiceless;. Since his retirement, Tutu has worked to critique the new South African government. Tutu has been vocal in condemnation of corruption, the ineffectiveness of the ANC-led government to deal with poverty, and the recent outbreaks of xenophobic violence in some townships in South Africa.

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Patron of the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation


Tutu's supporters consider him a tireless campaigner for health and human rights, and he has been particularly vocal in support of controlling TB and HIV. He is Patron of the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation, a registered Section 21 non-profit organisation, has served as the honorary chairman for the Global AIDS Alliance and is patron of TB Alert, a UK charity working internationally.

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The Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation

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In 2003 the Desmond Tutu HIV Centre was founded in Cape Town, while the Desmond Tutu TB Centre was founded in 2003 at Stellenbosch University.African history | Desmond Mpilo Tutu | south African history online. Tutu suffered from TB in his youth and has been active in assisting those afflicted, especially as TB and HIV/AIDS deaths have become intrinsically linked in South Africa.;Those of you who work to care for people suffering from AIDS and TB are wiping a tear from God’s eye; Tutu said.

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On 20 April 2005, after Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was elected as Pope Benedict XVI, Tutu said he was sad that the Roman Catholic Church was unlikely to change its opposition to condoms amidst the fight against HIV/AIDS in Africa;We would have hoped for someone more open to the more recent developments in the world, the whole question of the ministry of women and a more reasonable position with regards to condoms and HIV/AIDS;


In 2007, statistics were released that indicated HIV and AIDS numbers were lower than previously thought in South Africa. However, Tutu described these statistics as "cold comfort" as it was unacceptable that 600 people died of AIDS in South Africa every day. Tutu also rebuked the government for wasting time by discussing what caused HIV/AIDS, which particularly attacks Mbeki and Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang for their denialist stance.